Monday, September 21, 2015

Doggie door

One thing I’ve learned through the years is that kids find interesting uses for things that grownups could never imagine. If you don’t believe it, leave bubble wrap or a few large boxes lying around and watch what kids do with them. I’m constantly amazed at their ingenuity.

A few years ago a dog adopted us. At heart, he was a big ol’ puppy, but if a stranger walked into our yard, he would light them up.

It became obvious that if we didn’t want to be sued and have our homeowners insurance canceled, we’d better fence in our backyard. That turned out to be pricey, but in the scheme of things it was worth it.

The fence kept the dog contained, but each time we looked out the garden door, the sad-faced dog was looking through one of the windows wanting in. The problem was solved when we installed a doggie door.

The dog was not “the sharpest tool on the roof,” and did not immediately take to the doggie door. I’d crawl down and poke my head through the flap to try coaxing him into the house, but he wasn’t having any part of it. He couldn’t see what was on the other side so he refused to come through.

Finally, I physically dragged him through the opening and rewarded him with a Slim Jim treat. From that day on, he came and went as he pleased.

Then on a warm spring morning a few years ago, our great nephew Jordan who was about four-years-old at the time, walked over with his mom for a visit and to have hot dogs on the deck.

As we sat there eating, one of our dogs got tired of begging for food and decided to go back inside for water.

He disappeared through the doggie door. I saw Jordan’s face light up.

A moment later, he crawled through himself. We could hear him giggling from inside the house. Then he crawled out, and then back through the pooch door.


His meal was finished for the day. He spent the entire time following the dogs in and out of the house.

Later, he taught the disappearing act to his cousins Anthony, Stone, Breeze, Daisy and Joy.

Whenever a cousin comes to visit, Jordan demonstrates the coolest way to get in and out.

My great-niece Cassie has three kids at her house. Peyton, Parker, and Kay Lynn rarely come through the front door since they learned about the doggie entrance.

Even my great niece Zoe who is now “growny-fied” (is that a word?) has gone through our doggie door, though I’m guessing when she reads this, she’ll deny it to her friends.

This week when Jordan came over, he told me the doggie door was broken.

When I checked it out, the thick plastic flap had torn loose from its hangers. I’ll be going to the hardware store today to get a heavy-duty replacement.

The main thing I need to ensure is that it’s big enough for kids to fit through.

12 comments:

  1. The world is a place of wonder when viewed through the eyes of a kid.

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  2. What a cute story. Kids everywhere love to invent ways to keep amused. I guess the doggie door was a good investment for dogs and kids alike. I just hope no snakes crawls into the house through the doggie door.

    When I was young a snake had crawled under the screen door that was closed with a hook. The snake was strong enough to push a corner of the screen to slip in and it was a big snake although, not poisonous.

    JB

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  3. He is sweet. I bet he looked even cuter while going in and out of the doggie door.

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  4. So cute. Like you said, children are so inventive.

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  5. Only the other day,I was hoping you'd share more 'Jordan stories' ... and here you are!

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  6. This took me back I can remember my daughter crawling through the doggie door

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  7. In another life you musta been a kid, you understand them well. Many grown-up never understand kids, maybe they were born 21. Great entry.

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  8. and the kids don't ask for a treat. Love it!

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  9. A dual purpose door like that one can't be beat. I can only imagine the hours of fun the children had. Their imaginations lead them to do some wonderful things.

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  10. You are a remarkable uncle to allow the children the freedom to be themselves. I never child-proofed my house. If it isn't safe and fun for the little ones I don't want it.

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  11. Love the story!!
    Children will find fun things to do....and it makes my heart smile.
    PS I never throw bubble wrap away. It entertains for as long as the "pop" lasts. My Grands love that stuff!!!

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  12. While it might be wise to get started on puppies making use of one as soon as youthful from the training perspective, it can also be tough to find out specifically how huge your new puppy will sometime obtain. The majority of people overestimate, and get a new doorway even a great average-sized robbery can crawl through, which some of one's doggy can press in. Rather, choose a new decently size doorway to get started on. It's always possible to be able to update to your substantial doggy doorway, yet downgrading involves an entire doorway alternative. click here to know more http://dogsaholic.com/lifestyle/how-to-install-a-doggie-door.html

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