Friday, August 12, 2016

Watch the light

Someone asked me recently how to take good pictures. I smiled, because I've asked others that same question. Dale Short, one of my mentors in writing, is also a master photographer and I've helped him shoot pictures for years. What he told me was that the magic is in the light.

Also, anything you see from day to day has to potential to look incredible if you frame it right, and be mindful of the light.

You've probably seen and if you're like me, taken pictures of subjects when the light is behind them. If you're doing silhouettes, that's great. But if you're trying to capture a landscape, a portrait, or something else where detail is important, it won't happen because the light is not right.

This evening I ran back by the forks for a moment because a thundershower had swept through earlier, and I knew the turbines would be on which means mist on the water.

I shot a great picture of the clouds and sun, but it was too close to a picture I shot a few weeks ago, so I turned the lens downstream. Sitting on a big rock, I waited for the right moment for the evening light to fall on the water. It didn't take long.

These days, we've become a visual people. If you want to write a blog or tell a story, you get more traction if you have a picture. I'm thinking about a short ebook that will help people take better pictures with their cameras or phones.

Of course, I follow blogs written by people who are better photographers than me, but I'd like to share a few things I do know.

Stay tuned.





13 comments:

  1. "You waited." Perfect advice for those of us dashing pell-mell about our days.
    I think an ebook tutorial would be well received!

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  2. I think you're a great photographer--you must visualize the finished picture before you shoot it!!

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  3. I like the picture. Funny that, two people can shoot the same thing and looking at them, most times you can see the pro.
    I have had expensive cameras, I used them but never even close to their potential. I think I had a 35mm Nikon from the exchange when the PX had bargains. LOL No longer so... I liked the speed because I was shooting motocross the kids were in. I try now, but I am still a point and shoot kinda guy.

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  4. I like the picture. Funny that, two people can shoot the same thing and looking at them, most times you can see the pro.
    I have had expensive cameras, I used them but never even close to their potential. I think I had a 35mm Nikon from the exchange when the PX had bargains. LOL No longer so... I liked the speed because I was shooting motocross the kids were in. I try now, but I am still a point and shoot kinda guy.

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  5. I like taking pictures. I have a photo editor app and use my iphone. I usually wont edit outdoor photos because I feel guilty not showing the actual view. But no camera ive used can seem to capture what I really see. Your good.
    Lisa

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  6. Beautiful photo! I enjoy capturing the right light! A photo does say it all.

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  7. Another piece of advice for me is to make sure that fingers are not covering part of the lens.

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  8. You do get some wonderful pictures so I'm sure your advice is good. The proof is in the picture for sure !

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  9. I read somewhere that Ansel Adams would set up his camera and wait hours for the light to be just right so he could capture the effect he wanted.

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  10. Looking forward to your tips your photo is beautiful

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  11. I take terrible photos or so I have been told by many and by many I mean my husband and daughters

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  12. As an amateur photographer who relies on the skills of my old Canon AE, I always appreciate photography tips!

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