Thursday, June 29, 2017

Exploring the backroads

Several years ago, Jilda and I had time on our hands which is a rare thing for us. We decided to drive down to Tuscaloosa and have lunch at the City Grill. It's a local restaurant that opens at lunch in Northport. I don't think they advertise. People who eat there for the first time usually heard about it from a trusted friend who instructed, "Do yourself a favor and eat lunch at the City Grill."

We heard it from a food friend of ours and we weren't disappointed. It's a meat and three, but they are one of the few places that don't serve food from cans. Everything on their menu is fresh. We read a piece in the paper recently that one of the icons of food writing said that City Grill was the best restaurants in the state. Usually, when this happens, it's hard to get a table for a long time afterward. We'll see. But I digress.

After we ate, we decided to drive around South Alabama and let our lunch digest. Heading toward Demopolis, we came upon a stretch of road that displayed some fascinating yard art. This one of the Tin Man was as tall as a nearby telephone pole. I wish I knew the artist, but I don't

I pulled over long enough to snap a few pictures. The light was at the wrong angle, but you get the idea of how big this piece is. The legs are made from 55-gallon drums. The trunk looks like a culvert pipe. I have no idea how the artist managed to stand this baby up when it was finished.

We saw other things that were interesting as well. But that's what happens when you explore the backroads.


17 comments:

  1. Isn't it amazing what you can find on the backroads, that tin man was a major project indeed, pretty neat.

    I love to find places that cook from scratch, the food is so much better.

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  2. I love to see something that just 'knocks me out of my socks' (teen term from the 50's) I do get a kick out of a find. Yours is neat!
    THANKS, I am smiling.

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  3. What a find. Back roads are good just for relaxing but when you come across something like this it is a bonus.

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  4. I like that he has a heart!

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  5. The backroads are frequently a scenic delight - even with The Tinman as an extra bonus. And hooray for 'real' food.

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  6. Why would you go out to eat food from cans? You can stay home and do that.

    Alphie

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  7. Wow, Neat find! I love food from a Grill!!
    Lisa

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  8. The Tin Man is magnificent!!

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  9. Someone was very creative making that giant Tin Man.

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  10. What a great Tin Man for a landmark. You sure got a great photo even if the light was at the wrong angle. It's remarkable.
    Hugs, Julia

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  11. That restaurant sounds like some place we'd love! As a matter of fact, we stumbled across a small cafe (http://www.1220cafe.com/) in Tallassee that had some of the best, homemade food we've enjoyed in a long, long while. Methinks bigger's not necessarily better.

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  12. This Tin Man is great! He is very tall and the man must have used some sort of loader that he could stand in to set these barrels up. What great folk art! I would love to find a place like this that serves great meals and only locals know about it.

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  13. http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/7274 Jim Bird is the artist's name.

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    1. Wow! Thanks Wayne. I loved the pieces he had out there. I think Gee's Bend is close by there too and if I'm not mistaken, some of the quilts made there are in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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  14. It must be nice to go exploring with the one you love. I wish I had the Tin Man in my front yard.

    Love,
    Janie

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  15. I love taking road trips near home! We have an artist that has a bunch of sculptures in his yard with the tin man being one of them...not as large as that one though! It's fun to explore and find these treasures. Hope you have a wonderful weekend!

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