Thursday, December 07, 2017

Learning how to see

We have a Japanese Maple tree in the backyard. It's in a pot as big as Delaware. I'm not sure why we haven't planted it in the ground because the pot weights much too much to wag inside.

The thing about this small tree is that it's beautiful, especially in the fall. It was slow to turn when the weather got cold. It seemed to want it to be summer for a while longer. The last few days, it surrendered.

I snapped a picture.

A few nights ago, I posted the picture I took at the forks of the river on Facebook. Someone said they were studying photography but they couldn't afford a "good" camera. I mentioned that I took the picture with my phone.

The thing is, I have an expensive digital camera. But the pictures I take with it are no better than the ones I take with my phone. 

When I was learning photography, I spent so much time and energy on getting the image "technically" right, that I didn't focus on the subject.

Jilda, who is an artist, taught me how to "see" photographs. And it's made all the difference. The best camera in the world is the one you have with you.



10 comments:

  1. Glorious colour.
    As an appreciator (the label I am most comfortable with) I admire the work of both photographers and artists. And am grateful that there is room for happy snappers like myself.

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  2. Your teacher there certainly did a good job. You do take great pictures! Our leaves are gone for now, the trees are bare, but they'll come back in the spring.

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  3. Somehow we all 'knowed' Jilda was in there somewhere! The maple does produce some beautiful color.

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  4. You know more about photography than me. You always look for the play of light on the subject. You get a lot of positive feedback on your photography....

    The photo is beautiful but the rest of the tree is missing... I take a lot of photos and they are never perfect but then they are for me to remember a moment in my life.
    One thing I look for is if the photo is crisp and the details can be clearly seen as if I was looking at the real thing with my eyes. I know, it's not professional but the photos are great for remembering pass events especially at my age.

    Hugs, Julia

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  5. Beautiful Maple! I love when a picture luminates the main subject while blurring out the background. I wish I knew how to do that. Your shot is perfect.
    Lisa

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  6. My son has found that his phone is better for close-up shots but his digital camera is better for wide or distance photos.

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  7. Photos are usually better if you have an artist's eye & can "see" what the finished picture will be before you snap the picture!!

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  8. This is frame-worthy!

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  9. Proper equipment will only get you so far.

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  10. A truly beautiful photo - it makes my heart smile!

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